Level 5 CMMC - CMMC Practices

CM.2.065  

Reference: CMMC 1.02

Family: CM

Level Introduced: 2

Practice:
Track, review, approve, or disapprove, and log changes to organizational systems.

CMMC Clarification:
You should track, review, and approve changes before committing to production. Changes to computing environments can create unintended and unforeseen issues. They can affect the security and availability of the systems. Organizations should hold regular meetings about changes. Relevant experts should review and approve proposed changes. They should discuss potential impacts, before the organization puts the changes in place. Relevant items include changes to the physical environment and to the system hosted within it.

Example
Once a month, the management and technical team leads join a change control board meeting. During this meeting, everyone reviews all proposed changes to the environment. This includes changes to the physical and computing environments. The meeting ensures that relevant subject matter experts review changes and propose alternatives where needed.

3.4.3

Track, review, approve or disapprove, and log changes to organizational systems.

Discussion:
Tracking, reviewing, approving/disapproving, and logging changes is called configuration change control. Configuration change control for organizational systems involves the systematic proposal, justification, implementation, testing, review, and disposition of changes to the systems, including system upgrades and modifications. Configuration change control includes changes to baseline configurations for components and configuration items of systems, changes to configuration settings for information technology products (e.g., operating systems, applications, firewalls, routers, and mobile devices), unscheduled and unauthorized changes, and changes to remediate vulnerabilities.

Processes for managing configuration changes to systems include Configuration Control Boards or Change Advisory Boards that review and approve proposed changes to systems. For new development systems or systems undergoing major upgrades, organizations consider including representatives from development organizations on the Configuration Control Boards or Change Advisory Boards. Audit logs of changes include activities before and after changes are made to organizational systems and the activities required to implement such changes.

[SP 800-128] provides guidance on configuration change control.

Source: NIST Special Publication 800-171 Rev. 2

CM-3

CONFIGURATION CHANGE CONTROL

Description:
The organization:
    a. Determines the types of changes to the information system that are configuration-controlled;
    b. Reviews proposed configuration-controlled changes to the information system and approves or disapproves such changes with explicit consideration for security impact analyses;
    c. Documents configuration change decisions associated with the information system;
    d. Implements approved configuration-controlled changes to the information system;
    e. Retains records of configuration-controlled changes to the information system for [Assignment: organization-defined time period];
    f. Audits and reviews activities associated with configuration-controlled changes to the information system; and
    g. Coordinates and provides oversight for configuration change control activities through [Assignment: organization-defined configuration change control element (e.g., committee, board)] that convenes [Selection (one or more): [Assignment: organization-defined frequency]; [Assignment: organization-defined configuration change conditions]].

Supplemental Guidance:
Configuration change controls for organizational information systems involve the systematic proposal, justification, implementation, testing, review, and disposition of changes to the systems, including system upgrades and modifications. Configuration change control includes changes to baseline configurations for components and configuration items of information systems, changes to configuration settings for information technology products (e.g., operating systems, applications, firewalls, routers, and mobile devices), unscheduled/unauthorized changes, and changes to remediate vulnerabilities. Typical processes for managing configuration changes to information systems include, for example, Configuration Control Boards that approve proposed changes to systems. For new development information systems or systems undergoing major upgrades, organizations consider including representatives from development organizations on the Configuration Control Boards. Auditing of changes includes activities before and after changes are made to organizational information systems and the auditing activities required to implement such changes. Related controls: CA-7, CM-2, CM-4, CM-5, CM-6, CM-9, SA-10, SI-2, SI-12.

Source: NIST Special Publication 800-53 Rev. 4

Source: CMMC v1.02